Ana Sayfa | Manşetler

Iran’s active diplomatic engagement

Jonathan Fryer

Iran has said it supports the UN special envoy Kofi Annan’s Peace Plan for Syria, which is a welcome development and highlights the fact that any workable settlement may only be possible with Iran’s active diplomatic engagement. Tehran has long been Bashar al-Assad’s closest ally and one of the reasons it was able to endorse the Annan Plan was that that does not call for the removal of Assad, even if that is what many Syrians and Western countries, including Turkey, would prefer. So far, the Assad regime has remained deaf to pleas to end the assaults that have cost thouands of civilian lives as well as fuelling an inevitable armed opposition. But if Assad will listen to anyone, it would be the Iranians. And there is a wider point at stake here. Iran historically was a major regional power, indeed once the centre of a great empire. Recently, it has been trying to reassert its influence, not only in Iraq, which now has a Shiite-led government, but more widely. However, the policy of Washington and the EU — not to mention Israel — has been to isolate Iran and indeed subject it to punitive sanctions, because of the country’s nuclear programme, which may or may not be working towards the production of a nuclear weapons capability, according to who you believe. Certainly Iran’s Gulf neighbours don’t want to see a nuclear-armed Iran and two of them — Bahrain and Qatar — play host to US military forces. However, most of the Arab states in the Gulf are nonetheless engaging with Tehran, as they recognise that whatever differences they may have with the current government there, engagement is more likely to produce a modus vivendi than belligerency. This is a lesson the West could usefully learn. Of course there are many aspects of the Islamic Republic which leave Western governments uncomfortable, not least regarding human rights and President Ahmadinejad’s comments about the Holocaust, but that should not blind people to the fact that through engagement it is possible to work with countries which have totally different political systems or religious beliefs towards achieving common aims.
 
 
Jonathan is a freelance writer, lecturer and broadcaster on international affairs. For seven years, he was based in Brussels, initially for Reuters, and now writes mainly for the BBC and The Guardian. He has written a dozen non-fiction books, including volumes on Brussels and London. He also lectures part-time at London University’s School of Oriental and African Studies.
Jonathan has served as a London Borough Councillor (in Bromley) and fought three parliamentary elections. But the European Parliament has always been his ultimate goal. He has been fighting Euro-campaigns ever since the first direct elections to the European Parliament were held, and in 2004, came within a whisker of becoming an MEP for London. He’s determined to make it this time!

Selahattin Demirtaş Başbakan Erdoğan'ı Tehdit Etti

HDP Başkanı Selahattin Demirtaş Cumhurbaşkanlığı seçim kampanyası kapsamında yaptığı konuşmada AKP Lideri Başbakan Erdoğan hakkında açıklamalarda bulundu

Çanakkale'de Korkutan Deprem

AFAD'dan yapılan yazılı açıklamaya göre Çanakkale Eceabat'ta öğlen saatlerinde 4 büyüklüğünde deprem meydana geldi

İşsizlik rakamları açıklandı

Türkiye'de işsizlik oranları Nisan ayında yüzde 9 olarak gerçekleşti.

comments powered by Disqus